Italo Calvino’s Invisible Cities


Are you a fan of Italo Calvino, in particular his novel Invisible Cities?

Then I have something  here for you – a blog devoted to this fine piece of literature: Third Manifestation.

Third Manifestation muses about the literary and philosophical roots of this novel, addressing prominent writers and thinkers such as Jorge Luis Borges, Walter Benjamin and Jacques Lacan. You will find discussions on the book’s chapters, all supported with “city maps”, keywords and references.


Quick Access to Course Pages

Play is Older Than Culture

play interface

New Job

Today I completed a shift from my former employer, the İzmir University, to my new employer, the İzmir University of Economics.

I will teach simultaneously at two departments/faculties: The Art and Design faculty enrolled me to teach introductory art and design lessons, whereas the Software Engineering department invited me to teach game design lessons.

I’m very excited and I am looking forward to meet my new colleagues and students!

Paper Presentation at the ICIDS 2013

I’m back from Istanbul where I gave a talk in this year’s ICIDS. It was a great organization with very interesting keynote speakers such as Ernest Adams, Adam Russell and Toni Dove.

I presented a paper on the visual construction of narrative spaces in video games, which you can find here!

Next year’s ICIDS will take place in Singapore, and I’m looking forward to it!

Game Studies Symposium at Kadıköy

Today I was a moderator at the Game Studies Symposium that took place at TAK (Kadıköy Design Workshop), and I had the honour to sit around the same table with a number of prominent figures from the turkish game studies and game development scene: Kerem Yavuz Demirbaş (IT Kopenhagen, Marmara U.), Tonguç Sezen (Georgia Tech, Bilgi U.), Diğdem Sezen (Georgia Tech, İstanbul U.), and Fasih Sayın (Crytek İstanbul, İstanbul U.). We had an interesting talk about game studies in front of a group of around 100 game developers, game researchers and game enthusiasts. Topics changed quickly and showed great variety, and the audience was keen to jump in with nice comments!

Before and after the event, I find the chance to talk many friends such as Ali Batı (a very talented and successful game developer from İstanbul) and Orçun Nişli (known for his work on the game Monochrome), and also some of the students that I worked together with at the BUG Game Dev Summer School back in 2012: Engin, Furkan, Atakan, Güney and Şan.

The organizer of the event was Güven Çatak, founder and executive at BUG Labs in Bahçeşehir U./İstanbul, in cooperation with Mehmet Kentel from the turkish critical game studies blog Fareler Oyunda. I’m thankful for the good time they made possible for us!

Back from the Semiotics Congress in Burgos

Between October 16-18 I have been in Burgos/Spain to join a wonderful group of Semioticians from all around the World. I gave a talk on theories of game temporality in game studies, which can be found here.

I had been invited by Rayco Gonzalez from the University of Burgos in behalf of the Spanish Association of Semiotics. I was over the moon to meet semioticians like Bertrand Remy from Paris and Paolo Fabbri from Rome. Lucky enough to walk into a Jean Miro exhibition in the cathedral of Burgos, I also visited the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, something I was dreaming of ever since I saw the images of this building that was designed by Frank Gehry.

Beyond that, I liked Spain a lot, and I’d love to go back there again.


The underground literature movement Kült Neşriyat published a special issue on the Gezi Protests in Turkey. I contributed to this special issue with a short article on the relation between play and freedom, and gambling and oppression. You can download the issue here! The articles are all in turkish.

Game Idea #49

This time my game idea is about using the pages of a book to create a murder mystery puzzle in which the readers can play the role of detectives and jury members. Here is…


Whodunit? is a turn-based book reading game in which 2-6 players try to solve a murder mystery by being both detectives and jury members at the court.

Whodunit? comes in the form of a unbound book. Of a total of 52 pages, 5 pages per player are distributed at the start of the game.

All players are given some time to read the pages they received at game start.

In every round a player must then read the content of at least one page in his possession. This page is then discarded and the player who read it draws a new page from the deck.

Players can make a guess in regard to the murderer at any time, but this player must then explain in detail how he came to his conlusion by providing the evidence he collected. The other players act as a jury and decide whether they agree to a death penalty for the accused person.

They can then check whether they were right in their decision.


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